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  • ACRES: The official web site of the organization ACRES, the American Council on Rural Special Education.
  • AECMN: Association for the Education of Children with Medical Needs. On its history and organisation.
  • ASL Access: ASL Access takes the position that American Sign Language - ASL - is a unique language, used by many Deaf people and of practical value for others who appreciate visual communication. ASL Access encourages the acquisition and advancement of ASL skills, the appreciation of ASL literature, the provision of information in ASL, and the production of ASL video recordings. The mission of ASL Access is to provide ASL resources to public libraries as a service to communities.
  • AVKO: Dyslexia Research Foundation: The AVKO Dyslexia Research Foundation has been founded to help determine: What dyslexia is, why traditional methods of teaching reading and writing fail to help most dyslexics learn to read and write. What techniques seem to the best to teach dyslexics, what concepts are necessary for a dyslexic to learn, and what materials work best with dyslexics. What is needed to be done to raise the level of literacy to the point where the words, illiteracy, phonemic awareness, learning disabilities, dysgraphia, family literacy, adult literacy, and illegible handwriting will no longer have relevance.
  • Adolescence Directory On-Line: Electronic guide to information on adolescent issues. Offers web resources for educators, counselors, parents, researchers, health practitioners, and teens.
  • Adolescent Health Transition Project: Designed to help smooth the transition from pediatric to adult health care for adolescents with special health care needs. Includes `resource` information, materials, and links to other people with an interest in health transition issues.
  • Advocating Change Together: Advocating Change Together (ACT) started in 1979 in response to the growing concern that individuals with developmental disabilities were being isolated and excluded from decisions regarding their lives. ACT is a grassroots, member-controlled organization, run by and for persons with developmental and other disabilities.
  • Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing: The Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing is one of the world's largest membership organizations and information centers on hearing loss and the auditory approach. AG Bell focuses specifically on children with hearing loss, providing ongoing support and advocacy for parents, professionals and other interested parties.
  • All Kinds Of Minds: Undertakes applied research, product development, program design, and professional training to foster the understanding and optimal care of children with differences in learning.
  • American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology: Study and treatment of allergic diseases through education, research and cooperation. Physician referral directory. Kids only section.
  • American Academy of Pediatrics: The mission of the American Academy of Pediatrics is to attain optimal physical, mental and social health and well-being for all infants, children, adolescents and young adults.
  • American Association on Mental Retardation (AAMR): Promotes global development and dissemination of progressive policies, sound research, effective practices, and universal human rights for people with intellectual disabilities.
  • American Brain Tumor Association: The American Brain Tumor Association (ABTA) exists to eliminate brain tumors through research and to meet the needs of patients and families.
  • American Cancer Society: The American Cancer Society (ACS) is a nationwide, community- based voluntary health organization. Headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, the ACS has state divisions and more than 3,400 local offices.
  • American Council of the Blind: Strives to improve the well-being of all blind and visually impaired people by serving as a representative national organization of blind people; elevating the social, economic and cultural levels of blind people; and improving educational and rehabilitation facilities and opportunities.
  • American Diabetes Association: The mission of the organization is to prevent and cure diabetes, and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. To fulfill this mission, the American Diabetes Association funds research, publishes scientific findings, provides information and other services to people with diabetes, their families, health care professionals and the public and advocates for scientific research and for the rights of people with diabetes.
  • American Foundation for the Blind (AFB): The foundation's mission is to enable people who are blind or visually impaired to achieve equality of access and opportunity that will ensure freedom of choice in their lives.
  • American Music Therapy Association: Founded in 1998, AMTA's purpose is the progressive development of the therapeutic use of music in rehabilitation, special education, and community settings. Predecessors to the American Music Therapy Association included the National Association for Music Therapy founded in 1950 and the American Association for Music Therapy founded in 1971. AMTA is committed to the advancement of education, training, professional standards, credentials, and research in support of the music therapy profession.
  • American Nystagmus Network: The American Nystagmus Network seeks to provide technical and experiential information about nystagmus and its manifestations, but not medical advice. Information relates to a wide range of concerns including without limit, diagnosis, type, visual effects, non-visual effects, tests and available treatment. It also covers heredity, research, and known statistical data on nystagmus.
  • American Printing House for the Blind: Producing books, magazines, and other materials in braille, large print, recorded, and digital formats, writing and recording equipment, materials for teaching blind students, and special supplies used in education and by adults.
  • American Society for Action on Pain: ASAP is an organization of patients who suffer from chronic pain, their families, the physicians who treat them, and other interested citizens.
  • American Society for Deaf Children: An national, independent non-profit organization whose purpose is providing support, encouragement, and information to families raising children who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  • Angelman Syndrome Foundation: ASF's Mission is to advance the awareness and treatment of Angelman Syndrome through education, information exchange and research.
  • Anxiety Network International: The Anxiety Network International provides information on the three largest anxiety disorders:  social anxiety, panic/agoraphobia, and generalized anxiety.
  • Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation: AAMDS's mission is to serve as a `resource` directory for patient assistance and emotional support; provide educational materials and updated medical information; and financially support research to find effective treatments for aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.
  • Arthritis Foundation: Arthritis Foundation efforts center on the three-fold mission of the organization: research, prevention and quality of life. The Arthritis Foundation currently provides nearly $20 million in grants to nearly 300 researchers to help find a cure, prevention or better treatment for arthritis. The Arthritis Foundation?s sponsorship of research for more than 50 years has resulted in major treatment advances for most arthritis diseases.
  • Assistive Media: The mission of Assistive Media is to heighten the educational, cultural, and quality-of-living standard for people with disabilities and help achieve independence and become better integrated within the mainstream of society and community life in general. Assistive Media accomplishes this by providing free-of-charge, copyright-approved, high caliber audio literary works to the world-wide disability community via the Internet effectively, inexpensively and efficiently.
  • Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps (TASH): TASH is an international association of people with disabilities, their family members, other advocates, and professionals fighting for a society in which inclusion of all people in all aspects of society is the norm.
  • Asthma and Allergy Foundations of America: The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) is the premier patient organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for people with asthma and allergies through education, advocacy and research. Kids and Teens section.
  • Autism Society of America: The society's mission is to promote lifelong access and opportunities for persons within the autism spectrum and their families.
  • Bandaides and Blackboards: The intent of the site is to sensitize people to what it's like to grow up with a medical problem. Too often, youngsters so affected must cope with stigma as well as with their medical conditions. Teasing often accompanies this stigma, and adds a layer of pain to their experience of childhood. Unnecessary pain. Pain that isolates. Pain that affects not only the children who look or act or even just feel different, but all of the children in the classroom.
  • Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law: The Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law is a nonprofit legal advocacy organization based in Washington D.C. Our name honors the federal appeals court judge whose landmark decisions pioneered the field of mental health law, and our advocacy is based on the principle that every individual is entitled to choice and dignity.
  • Best Buddies: Best Buddies is a non-profit organization dedicated to enhancing the lives of people with mental retardation by providing opportunities for one-to-one friendships and integrated employment. Best Buddies has grown from one chapter on one college campus to a vibrant, international organization involving participants annually on more than 500 middle school, high school and college campuses in the United States, Canada, Egypt, and Greece. In our 11 years of existence,
  • Brain Injury Association: The mission of the Brain Injury Association is to create a better future through brain injury prevention, research, education and advocacy. This site provides a vast amount of information and state resources.
  • Burn Survivors Online: Burn Survivors Online (BSO) is a leading interactive Internet `resource` providing general medical information on burn injuries and a range of avenues offering peer support for burn survivors and their families. Through the World Wide Web, BSO is able to reach out to people in need, no matter where they reside.
  • Burn Survivors Throughout The World , Inc.: Nonprofit organization providing medical and psychological education on burn injuries.
  • C.H.A.D.D -Children and Adults with Attention Deficit Disorders: A national non-profit organization representing children and adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD). CHADD works to improve the lives of people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder through education, advocacy and support.
  • CHERAB (Apraxis): CHERAB Foundation is a Non-Profit Organization, a partnership of families and professionals working together to provide support and information for those who care for children that are late talkers, or for those diagnosed with apraxia. Our goal to is raise awareness about the importance of Early Diagnosis and Early Intervention. We also wish to raise awareness about the world's number one disability, communication disorders, and when, how and where to go for help.
  • Canine Companions: Canine Companions for Independence is a non-profit organization that enhances the lives of people with disabilities by providing highly trained assistance dogs and ongoing support to ensure quality partnerships.
  • Captioned Media Program: Free-loan media (no rental fees). Open-captioned (no need for a decoder). Funded by the U.S. Department of Education. Includes prepaid return labels. Deaf and hard of hearing persons, teachers, parents, and others may borrow materials. Other services include provision of free captioning information.
  • Center for Applied Special Technology: We believe that the most effective strategy for expanding educational opportunities for individuals with disabilities is through Universal Design for Learning. Our work now focuses the development of learning models, approaches, and tools that are usable by a wide range of learners and CAST's impact is seen locally, nationally, and internationally.
  • Center for Law and Education: Educational Rights of Students with Disabilities Project CLE has worked since its inception to vindicate the right of all students with disabilities to full and equal opportunity in public education, with a particular emphasis on issues critical to low-income children and youth. CLE also publishes materials concerning the legal rights of students with disabilities.
  • Center for an Accessible Society: Funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, The Center for An Accessible Society is a national organization designed to focus public attention on disability and independent living issues by disseminating information developed through NIDRR-funded research to promote independent living.
  • Center for the Study of Autism: Provides resources for both professions and family members of individuals with autism. Includes interventions, family support, and stories of persons with autism.
  • Child and Adolescent Bipolar Foundation: Early intervention and treatment offers the best chance for children with bipolar disorder to achieve stability, gain the best possible level of wellness, and grow up to enjoy their gifts and build upon their strengths. Proper treatment can minimize the adverse effects of the illness on their lives and the lives of those who love them
  • Children, Youth, and Family Consortium: The Children, Youth, and Family Consortium was established during the Fall of 1991 to bring together the varied competencies of the University of Minnesota and the vital resources of Minnesota's communities to enhance the ability of individuals and organizations to address critical health, education, and social policy concerns in ways that improve the well-being of Minnesota's children, youth, and families.
  • Childrens' Craniofacial Association: Children's Craniofacial Association is a national, 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, dedicated to improving the quality of life for people with facial differences and their families. Nationally and internationally, CCA addresses the medical, financial, psychosocial, emotional, and educational concerns relating to craniofacial conditions. CCA's mission is to empower and give hope to facially disfigured children and their families.
  • Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation: The Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation (CRPF) encourages and supports research to develop effective treatments and a cure for paralysis caused by spinal cord injury and other central nervous system disorders. The Foundation evaluates and selects these research programs using councils of internationally renowned neuroscientists and clinicians. The Foundation also allocates a portion of its resources to grants that improve the quality of life for people with disabilities.
  • Chronic Ill Net: ChronicIllnet is the first multimedia information source on the Internet dedicated to chronic illnesses including AIDS, cancer, Persian Gulf War Syndrome, autoimmune diseases, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, heart disease and neurological diseases. This site speaks to many different people--researchers, patients, laypeople, and physicians, to name a few.
  • ClercCenter at Gallaudet University: The national mission is to develop, collect, disseminate, conduct research into and evaluate the most effective literacy strategies, family education methods, and school- to-work transition practices with deaf and hard of hearing students.
  • Closing The Gap: Focuses on computer technology for people with special needs through its bi-monthly newspaper, annual international conference and extensive web site.
  • Consortium for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE): CADRE supports parents, educators and administrators to benefit from the full continuum of dispute resolution options that can prevent and resolve conflict and ultimately lead to informed partnerships that focus on results for children and youth.
  • Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities: The Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities is a Coalition of national consumer, advocacy, provider and professional organizations headquartered in Washington, D.C. Since 1973, the CCD has advocated on behalf of people of all ages with physical and mental disabilities and their families. CCD has worked to achieve federal legislation and regulations that assure that the 54 million children and adults with disabilities are fully integrated into the mainstream of society.
  • Coordinated Campaign for Learning Disabilities: Six nonprofit leaders in the field of learning disabilities form the core of the Coordinated Campaign for Learning Disabilities (CCLD): Organizations include: Council for Learning Disabilities, Division for Learning Disabilities, International Dyslexia Association, National Center for Learning Disabilities, Learning Disabilities Association, and the Schwab Learning Center. These organizations work together to make people aware of learning disabilities, share information with parents and promote the need for early detection and intervention.
  • Correctional Education Association: The Correctional Education Association (CEA), founded in 1946, is a non-profit, professional association serving educators and administrators who provide services to students in correctional settings. The CEA is the largest affiliate of the American Correctional Association
  • Council for Disability Rights: On national, state, and local levels, the Council for Disability Rights advances the rights of people with disabilities. The Council promotes public policy and legislation, public awareness through education, and provides information and referral services.
  • Council for Exceptional Children: Largest international professional organization dedicated to improving educational outcomes for individuals with exceptionalities. Primarily for professionals in the field of special education.
  • Council for Parents, Attorneys and Advocates: COPAA does not represent the interests of any single type of disability. COPAA's chief concern is the availability and quality of legal and advocacy services for parents of children with all disabilities. The prime objective is to better integrate the unique strengths of parent, advocate and attorney to keep the costs of legal assistance manageable, while improving their availability and quality.
  • Crespar: Center for Research on the Education of Students Placed At Risk. Concerned with conducting research, intervention, evaluation, and dissemination projects to better ensure the academic success of children from groups that have historically been placed at risk for educational failure.
  • Debbie Chisholm Memorial Foundation: Organization dedicated to granting wishes of terminally ill children.
  • Disabilities Statistics Center: The center's purpose is to produce and disseminate statistical information on disability and the status of people with disabilities in American society and to establish and monitor indicators of how conditions are changing over time.
  • Disability Information for Students and Professionals: A multi-featured news, jobs, and discussion `resource` for students from around the world studying to support and work for individuals with disabilities.
  • DisabilityOnline.com: A huge directory for everything having to do with disabilities. Very impressive site
  • EASI Equal Access to Software and Information: A `resource` to the education community that provides information and guidance in the area of access-to-information technologies by individuals with disabilities.
  • Eating Disorders Education Organization: EDEO is involved in providing information on eating disorders and offering support to families and friends of individuals with eating disorders.
  • Epilepsy Foundation: The Epilepsy Foundation is a national, charitable organization, founded in 1968 as the Epilepsy Foundation of America. The only such organization wholly dedicated to the welfare of people with epilepsy, our mission is simple: to work for children and adults affected by seizures through research, education, advocacy and service.
  • Families for Early Autism Treatment: FEAT (Families for Early Autism Treatment) is a non-profit organization of parents and professionals, designed to help families with children who have received the diagnosis of Autism or Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD NOS).
  • Family Village: A global community that integrates information, resources, and communication opportunities on the Internet for persons with cognitive and other disabilities, for their families, and for those that provide them services and support.
  • Family and Advocates Partnership in Education: The Family & Advocates Partnership for Education (FAPE) Web site is a new project which aims to inform and educate families and advocates about the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1997 and promising practices.
  • Federation of Families for Children's Mental Health: To address the unique needs of children and youth with emotional, behavioral or mental disorders from birth through transition to adulthood. To ensure the rights of full citizenship, support and access to community-based services for all children and youth with emotional, behavioral or mental disorders and their families. To provide information and engage in advocacy regarding research, prevention, early intervention, family support, education, transition services and other services needed by these children, youth and their families
  • Hospice Foundation of America: The Hospice Foundation of America is a nonprofit organization that promotes hospice care and works to educate professionals and the families they serve in issues relating to caregiving, terminal illness, loss and bereavement.
  • Hydrocephalus Association: The Hydrocephalus Association's mission is to provide support, education and advocacy for individuals, families and professionals.
  • Inclusion Network: The Inclusion Network is a non-profit organization whose staff and volunteers partner to promote inclusion of people with disabilities.
  • International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities (IASSID): The International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities (mental retardation and related developmental disabilities) is an international and interdisciplinary scientific organization that promotes worldwide research and exchange of information on intellectual disabilities.
  • International Dyslexia Organization: The International Dyslexia Association is an international, non-profit organization dedicated to the study and treatment of the learning disability, dyslexia. The IDA was established to continue the pioneering work of Dr. Samuel T. Orton, a neurologist who was one of the first to begin to identify dyslexia and develop effective teaching approaches.
  • International Federation for Hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida: Its mission is to improve the quality of life of people with Hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida throughout the world. To decrease the prevalence of Hydrocephalus and/or Spina Bifida by primary prevention.
  • International Rett Syndrome Association: The mission of the IRSA is: to support and encourage medical research to determine the cause and find a cure for Rett syndrome, to increase public awareness of Rett syndrome, and to provide informational and emotional support to families of children with Rett syndrome.
  • Internet Special Education Resources: ISER is a nationwide directory of professionals who serve the learning disabilities and special education communities. We help parents and caregivers find local special education professionals to help with learning disabilities and attention deficit disorder assessment, therapy, advocacy, and other special needs.
  • LD - Parent Soup Education Central: We've all heard those phrases: "underachieving, sloppy, not living up to potential, disruptive, careless." The reality behind the words is that many of our kids struggle through school with undetected learning problems. The right help will make a difference.
  • Learn CPR: This web site is to be used as a free guide and an informational resource, but it cannot replace real CPR or first aid training. Please try to attend a CPR training course in your community and help save a life. The information in this web site is based, in part, on guidelines contained in American Heart Association, Guidelines 2000 for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care.
  • Learning Disablities Council: The LDC addresses issues affecting children and adults with learning disabilities. Includes newsletter and forum.
  • Little People of America: Little People of America, Inc. (LPA), will assist dwarfs with their physical and developmental concerns resulting from short stature. By providing medical, environmental, educational, vocational, and parental guidance, short-statured individuals and their families may enhance their lives and lifestyles with minimal limitations. Through peer support and personal example, our members will be supportive of all those who reach out to LPA. Lastly, by networking with national and international growth-related and genetic-support groups, LPA will enhance knowledge and support of short-statured individuals.
  • Lupus Foundation of America: The Lupus Foundation of America is the only nationwide voluntary organization exclusively serving the entire lupus community, including patients, their families, physicians, researchers, and the general public. Our mission is to educate and support those affected by lupus and find the cure.
  • MAX Foundation: The MAX Foundation is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of special education awareness and to support deserving schools, research centers and organizations providing for children with special needs.
  • Mobility International: As a US-based national non-profit organization, the mission of Mobility International USA (MIUSA) is to empower people with disabilities around the world through international exchange, information, technical assistance and training, and to ensure the inclusion of people with disabilities in international exchange and development programs
  • Muscular Dystrophy Association: The Muscular Dystrophy Association is a voluntary health agency -- a dedicated partnership between scientists and concerned citizens aimed at conquering neuromuscular diseases that affect more than a million Americans.
  • National Association of Protection and Advocacy Systems: Nationwide network of congressionally mandated, legally-based disability rights agencies. P&A agencies have the authority to provide legal representation and other advocacy services, under all federal and state laws, to all people with disabilities (based on a system of priorities for services).
  • National Academy for Child Development: The National Academy for Child Development, Inc. is an international organization of parents and professionals dedicated to helping children and adults reach their full potential. The over 15,000 clients served by NACD have come to us with labels including: Learning Disabled, Dyslexic, Distractible, ADD, ADHD, Hyperactive, Down Syndrome, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, Williams Syndrome, Tourettes Syndrome, Rett Syndrome, Fragile X, Developmentally Delayed, PDD, Autistic, Cerebral Palsy, Brain Injured, Comatose, Retarded, Minimal Brain Dysfunction, Normal, Accelerated and Gifted.
  • National Alliance for the Mentally Ill: The mission of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill is "to eradicate mental illness and improve the quality of life of those affected by these diseases." NAMI has affiliate organizations in every state.
  • National Arts and Disability Center: The National Arts and Disability Center (NADC) is the national information dissemination, technical assistance and referral center specializing in the field of arts and disability. The NADC is dedicated to promoting the full inclusion of children and adults with disabilities into the visual-, performing-, media, and literary-arts communities. Its `resource` directories, annotated bibliographies, related links and conferences serve to advance artists with disabilities and accessibility to the arts.
  • National Association for the Education of Young Children: The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) is the nation's largest organization of early childhood professionals and others dedicated to improving the quality of early childhood education programs for children birth through age eight.
  • National Association of the Deaf: The NAD safeguards the accessibility and civil rights of 28 million deaf and hard of hearing Americans in a variety of areas including education, employment, health care and social services, and telecommunications.
  • National Ataxia Foundation: The National Ataxia Foundation is a nonprofit organization established in 1957 with the primary mission of encouraging and supporting research into Hereditary Ataxia, a `group` of neurological disorders which are chronic and progressive conditions affecting coordination. There are more than 45 affiliated chapters and support groups throughout the U.S. and Canada.
  • National Center for Early Development and Learning: Research at the National Center for Early Development & Learning (NCEDL), focuses on enhancing the cognitive, social and emotional development of children from birth through age eight.
  • National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) is the lead federal agency for injury prevention, NCIPC works closely with other federal agencies; national, state, and local organizations; state and local health departments; and research institutions.
  • National Center for Learning Disabilities: NCLD's Mission is to promote public awareness and understanding of children and adults with learning disabilities, and to provide national leadership on their behalf, so they may achieve their potential and enjoy full participation in our society.
  • National Center for the Dissemination of Research Research: Outcomes of disability research should offer great utility to people with disabilities and their families, practitioners engaged in various types of disability service delivery, scientists and researchers, policymakers, journalists, healthcare providers, employers, and many others.
  • National Center on Education, Disability, and Juvenile Justice: NCEDJJ is a collaborative research, training, technical assistance and dissemination program designed to develop more effective responses to the needs of youth with disabilities in the juvenile justice system or those at-risk for involvement with the Juvenile Justice System.
  • National Center to Improve Practice in Special Education: The National Center to Improve Practice was federally funded project to improve educational outcomes for students with disabilities by promoting the effective use of assistive and instructional technologies among educators and related personnel serving these students.
  • National Cued Speech Association: Cued Speech is a sound-based visual communication system which, in English, uses eight handshapes in four different locations ("cues") in combination with the natural mouth movements of speech, to make all the sounds of spoken language look different. Our mission is to promote and support the effective use of Cued Speech for communication, language acquisition and literacy.
  • National Down Syndrome Society: The National Down Syndrome Society is a not-for-profit organization that has become the largest non-governmental supporter of Down syndrome research in the United States. Today, NDSS continues to increase public awareness about Down syndrome and discover its underlying causes through research, education and advocacy.
  • National Family Caregivers: Activities list, personal accounts, promotional materials, and sponsor information for the National Family Caregivers Month 2001.
  • National Fathers Network: The National Fathers Network (NFN) advocates for and provides resources and support to all men who have children with special needs through: Development of national and statewide databases of fathers from diverse ethnic, racial, and geographic backgrounds; Development of father support and mentoring programs; Development of curriculum (monographs and videos) designed to enhance the involvement of fathers in the home and service provision (i.e., health care settings, schools);
  • National Fibromyalgia Partnership: NFP's mission is to make medically-accurate, quality `resource` information on fibromyalgia (FM) available to our membership, health care professionals, and the community-at-large. Our Goal is to provide informational tools so as to promote the timely and appropriate diagnosis and treatment of fibromyalgia.
  • National Institute of Mental Health: The public section offers information from NIMH about the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of mental illnesses. Included are brochures and information sheets, reports, press releases, fact sheets, and other educational materials.
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders: Conducts, fosters, coordinates, and guides research on the causes, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of neurological disorders and stroke, and supports basic research in related scientific areas.
  • National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). We are part of the U.S. Government, under the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Provides comprehensive information on all areas of deafness and other communication disorders.
  • National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped: A free national library program of braille and recorded materials for blind and physically handicapped persons is administered by the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS), Library of Congress. Under a special provision of the U.S. copyright law and with the permission of authors and publishers of works not covered by the provision, NLS selects and produces full-length books and magazines in braille and recorded formats.
  • National Mental Health Association: The NMHA is an excellent `resource` for consumer, professionals, advocates or anyone interested in all aspects of mental health. Contains legislative alerts, media reviews, and a vast array of materials.
  • National Mental Health Services Knowledge Exchange Network (KEN): KEN provides a wealth of information regarding mental health. It has an extensive section dedicated to services and resources for children and adolescents. Hundreds of publications are available along with links to other sites dealing mental health issues.
  • National Organization for Rare Disorders: The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a unique federation of voluntary health organizations dedicated to helping people with rare "orphan" diseases and assisting the organizations that serve them. NORD is committed to the identification, treatment, and cure of rare disorders through programs of education, advocacy, research, and service.
  • National Organization on Disabilities: The National Organization on Disability promotes the full and equal participation of America's 54 million men, women and children with disabilities in all aspects of life. N.O.D. was founded in 1982 at the conclusion of the United Nations International Year of Disabled Persons. N.O.D. is the only national disability network organization concerned with all disabilities, all age groups and all disability issues.
  • National PTA: National PTA is the largest volunteer child advocacy organization in the United States. A not-for-profit association of parents, educators, students, and other citizens active in their schools and communities, PTA is a leader in reminding our nation of its obligations to children. Good resources on disabilities.
  • National Sleep Foundation: The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to improving public health and safety by achieving public understanding of sleep and sleep disorders, and by supporting public education, sleep-related research, and advocacy.
  • National Spinal Cord Injury Association: The NSCIA has many chapters throughout the United States. Members work with local and national officials and agencies to develop better programs and services and act as community advocates for improved access, housing, transportation, employment, and leisure time activities for disabled people. Peer support and other services are also provided. These are fundamental aspects of living that 500,000 people with spinal cord injuries or diseases must cope with after they have been rehabilitated and have returned to community life.
  • National Sports Center for the Disabled: The National Sports Center for the Disabled (NSCD), is an innovative non-profit organization that provides recreation for children and adults with disabilities.
  • Nonverbal Learning Disabilities Association: The NLDA promotes education, support, and advocacy for people with Nonverbal Learning Disabilities, and for professionals and family members.
  • Nostra Sra. de Meritxell: Andorran center of attention to the handicapped
  • Obsessive Compulsive Foundation: Provides support to educate the public and professional communities about OCD and related disorders; to provide assistance to individuals with OCD and related disorders, their family and friends; and to fund research into the causes and effective treatments of OCD and related disorders.
  • Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation: Supports and encourages medical research, educates the public, and disseminates information to patients, their families, and medical professionals
  • Our-Kids: Our-Kids is a "Family" of parents, caregivers and others who are working with children with physical and/or mental disabilities and delays. We call the list "Our-Kids". While it isn't exactingly descriptive, it avoids the pitfalls of labeling our kids anything but what they most certainly are: The wonderful little people in our lives.
  • PUSH America: PUSH America is the national outreach project of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity. Because of our commitment to brotherhood, we provide leadership opportunities, services and education to promote a greater understanding of persons who have developmental disabilities.
  • Parent Educational Advocacy Training Center (PEATC): Assists the families of children with disabilities through education, information and training. PEATC builds parent-professional partnerships to promote success in school and community life. Based in Virginia.
  • ParentPals: Parent Pals is sponsored by Ameri-Corp Speech and Hearing. Our goal is to provide special education and gifted information, continuing education, support, weekly tips, games, book resources, and news and views for parents and professionals. Therapists, audiologists, teachers, nurses and physicians contribute information on the following subjects: ADHD, autism, deaf and hard of hearing, emotionally disturbed, homeschooling, gifted, learning disabilities, mental retardation, orthopedically impaired, otherwise health impaired, severe and/or multiple disabilities, speech and language impairment, stuttering, traumatic brain injury and, visually impaired.
  • Paws With A Cause: Trains assistance dogs nationally for people with disabilities and provides lifetime team support which encourages independence. PAWS promotes awareness through education.
  • Prader-Willi Syndrome Association: Prader-Willi Syndrome Association (USA) is dedicated to serving individuals affected by Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS), their families, and interested professionals. To provide information, education, and support services to its members.
  • Prevent Blindness America: Volunteer eye health and safety organization dedicated to fighting blindness and saving sight.
  • Recordings for the Blind and Dyslexic: RFB&D is the nation's educational library for people with print disabilities. We provide educational materials in recorded and computerized formats from kindergarten through postgraduate level. Materials are for all people who cannot effectively read standard print because of a visual, perceptual or other physical disability.
  • Schwab Learning: Dedicated to raising awareness about learning differences and to providing parents with the information, resources and support they need to improve the lives of kids with learning differences.
  • Scoliosis Association, The: The Scoliosis Association, Inc. is a non-profit, volunteer non-medical organization. Since 1974, we have been helping those with scoliosis by providing information and having support groups and information lines.
  • Sidran: Tramautic Stress Foundation: Sidran is a nonprofit charitable organization devoted to education, advocacy, and research to benefit people who are suffering from injuries of traumatic stress. Whether caused by family violence, crime, disasters, war, or any other overwhelming experience, the disabling effects of trauma can be overcome with understanding, support, and appropriate treatment.
  • Smile Train, The: The Smile Train is a non-profit organization that is committed to eradicating the problem of cleft lips and palates.
  • SpEdEx: Whether you are an educator, professional, parent, consumer, student, or just someone interested in special education, we hope that you find what you need here at SpEdEx. We have strived to provide resources such as links, online documents, listings of professionals, job listings, school and university listings, conference announcements, a discussion area, and "poster sessions" in easy-to-use formats.
  • Special Friends Foundation: The primary mission of the Special Friends Foundation is to enable families to understand quickly what Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RTS) is all about and what resources are available.
  • Special Needs - Special Kids: Disability Awareness: The objectives of this site include promoting the awareness of children with special needs of all kinds; promoting brighter futures for them and their families; and to provide support and education resources for their families, and those who support them.
  • Spina Bifida Association of American: The Mission of the Spina Bifida Association of America is to promote the prevention of spina bifida and to enhance the lives of all affected. The Association was founded in 1973 to address the specific needs of the spina bifida community and serves as the national representative of over 70 chapters. SBAA's efforts benefit thousands of infants, children, adults, parents and professionals each year.
  • Starbright Foundation: The STARBRIGHT Foundation is dedicated to the development of projects that empower seriously ill children to combat the medical and emotional challenges they face on a daily basis. STARBRIGHT projects do more than educate or entertain: they address the core issues that accompany illness ? the pain, fear, loneliness, and depression that can be as damaging as the sickness itself.
  • TechDis: U.K.-based service aimed at enhancing access for those with learning difficulties and/or disabilities, to learning and teaching, research and administration across higher and further education through the use of information and communication technologies. (United Kingdom)
  • The Center for Disease Control and Prevention: BAM! Body and Mind: Provide information, materials for students and classrooms. Has related information about birth defects, child development, and disability and health.
  • The Hong Kong Society for the Blind Communication Department: Works to provide comprehensive library services in Braille and provide recorded reading materials to visually impaired people of all age groups in Hong Kong and to ensure their right to the    access of information.
  • Tourette Syndrome Association: Develops and disseminates educational materials; stimulates support for research; apprises members of rights, services, and benefits provided by government and other organizations
  • Turner Syndrome Society of the United States: Mission is to increase public awareness and understanding of Turner Syndrome; increase understanding of those affected by Turner Syndrome about the condition and its associated problems; provide a forum where those affected by Turner Syndrome can become acquainted with others in similar situations; and work together with medical and health-care professionals to better understand the condition through research and communication of ideas.
  • Tyler For Life Foundation, The: The Tyler For Life Foundation, Inc. is a non-profit voluntary organization whose mission is to improve the lives of babies by preventing mental retardation and death resulting from disorders detectable through newborn screening.
  • United Cerebral Palsy: This site serves as the gateway to all state and local United Cerebral Palsy chapters.
  • United Ostomy Association: The United Ostomy Association is a volunteer-based health organization dedicated to providing education, information, support and advocacy for people who have had or will have intestinal or urinary diversions.
  • Very Special Arts: VSA arts is an International organization that creates learning opportunities through the arts for people with disabilities. The organization offers arts-based programs in creative writing, dance, drama, music and the visual arts implemented primarily through our vast affiliate network in 41 states and the District of Columbia and 86 international affiliates in 83 countries. VSA arts' programs now serve 4.3 million Americans and 1.3 million people in other parts of the world.
  • World Association of Persons with Disabilities: WAPD advances the interests of persons with disAbilities at national, state, local and home levels. We believe that all are entitled to high quality of life. Over ten years of "grassroots" planning and growth have catapulted the association to a world leadership position, advancing the soundness and empowerment of the so called "disAbled" everywhere.
  • Wrightslaw: Parents, advocates, educators, and attorneys come to Wrightslaw for accurate, up-to-date information about effective advocacy for children with disabilities. You'll find hundreds of articles, cases, newsletters, and other information about special education law and advocacy in the Wrightslaw Advocacy and Law Libraries.
  • disability.gov: A comprehensive site of US federal programs for families dealing with disabilities. Includes a section specifically related to children.
  • iCanOnline: iCanOnline brings together content, community and resources in one place that is easy to navigate and welcomes your input. This site is for individuals of all ages; however, it includes many resources relating to child and youth.

 

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